ingredients

Salt

<a href="http://www.cdc.gov/salt/infographic.htm?s_cid=info-salt-01&utm_campaign=Sodium Infographic&utm_medium=infographic&utm_source=external&utm_content=info-salt-01" title="Tracking down the salt in food with Professor Saul T. Too much sodium increases your risk for high blood pressure, and high blood pressure is the leading cause of heart attack and stroke. By taking the right steps to reduce your sodium intake, your blood pressure can begin decreasing within weeks. About 90% of Americans eat more sodium than is recommended for a healthy diet. Six in 10 adults should aim for 1,500 milligrams a day; others for 2,300 milligrams. Sodium adds up, and sodium levels in the same food can vary widely. Fat free chips can have 180 milligrams per ounce; white bread, up to 230 milligrams per slice; ready-to-eat cereal, 250 milligrams per cup; chicken breast with added solution, up to 330 milligrams per 4 ounces. Foods that you eat several times a day can add up to a lot of sodium, even if each serving is not high in sodium. Read Nutrition labels to find the lowest sodium options. A bowl of regular chicken noodle soup can have 840 milligrams of sodium, but lower sodium chicken noodle soup can have 360 milligrams of sodium. Most of the sodium we eat comes from foods prepared in restaurants and processed foods (not from the salt shaker). Tips you can use to reduce sodium: Choose fresh, frozen (no sauce), or no salt added canned vegetables; Know terms that commonly indicate higher sodium content, like pickled, cured, brined, and broth; Follow the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) eating plan at http://go.usa.gov/p3C. For more tips on reducing sodium in your diet, visit http://go.usa.gov/YJxF. This infographic is brought to you by Million Hearts. millionhearts.hhs.gov"><img src="http://www.cdc.gov/salt/images/info_salt_01.jpg" style="width:1543px; height:1324px; border:0px;" alt="Tracking down the salt in food with Professor Saul T. Too much sodium increases your risk for high blood pressure, and high blood pressure is the leading cause of heart attack and stroke. By taking the right steps to reduce your sodium intake, your blood pressure can begin decreasing within weeks. About 90% of Americans eat more sodium than is recommended for a healthy diet. Six in 10 adults should aim for 1,500 milligrams a day; others for 2,300 milligrams. Sodium adds up, and sodium levels in the same food can vary widely. Fat free chips can have 180 milligrams per ounce; white bread, up to 230 milligrams per slice; ready-to-eat cereal, 250 milligrams per cup; chicken breast with added solution, up to 330 milligrams per 4 ounces. Foods that you eat several times a day can add up to a lot of sodium, even if each serving is not high in sodium. Read Nutrition labels to find the lowest sodium options. A bowl of regular chicken noodle soup can have 840 milligrams of sodium, but lower sodium chicken noodle soup can have 360 milligrams of sodium. Most of the sodium we eat comes from foods prepared in restaurants and processed foods (not from the salt shaker). Tips you can use to reduce sodium: Choose fresh, frozen (no sauce), or no salt added canned vegetables; Know terms that commonly indicate higher sodium content, like pickled, cured, brined, and broth; Follow the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) eating plan at http://go.usa.gov/p3C. For more tips on reducing sodium in your diet, visit http://go.usa.gov/YJxF. This infographic is brought to you by Million Hearts. millionhearts.hhs.gov" /></a>

Education, ingredients

Buckwheat:

Buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum) is a plant cultivated for its grain-like seeds, and also used as a cover crop. Despite the name, buckwheat is not related to wheat, as it is not a grass; instead, buckwheat is related to sorrel, knotweed, and rhubarb. The cultivation of buckwheat grain declined sharply in the 20th century with the adoption of nitrogen fertilizer that increased the productivity of other staples. A related species, Fagopyrum tataricum (Tartary buckwheat) is also cultivated as a grain in the Himalayas.
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Food, ingredients

Spinach Balls

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Spinach Balls
Source: A friend

Ingredients
2 (10 oz.) packages frozen spinach, thawed & well-drained
2 small onions, very finely chopped (I use a food processor)
2 1/4 c. stuffing with herbs (I use Pepperidge Farm)
6 eggs, beaten
1/2 c. melted butter
1/2 c. Parmesan cheese
2 tsp. garlic salt
1 tsp. black pepper

Directions
1. Mix all ingredients until well combined. Form into about 1″ balls; place on a baking sheet sprayed with cooking spray.

2. Bake at 350 for 20 minutes. Makes approximately 60 balls.

NOTES:
Spinach balls may be frozen, either baked or unbaked. (I always freeze mine pre-baked.)
For pre-baked balls: Remove from freezer about 30 minutes prior to reheating. Reheat in a 350 degree oven for about 10 minutes.
For unbaked balls: Remove from freezer 30 minutes before cooking. Bake as directed (350 for 20 minutes).

Enjoy!

ingredients

Tomato Cucumber Salad: Freckled Foodie

Cucumber Tomato Salad – Noodles & Company Copycat Recipe
Food, Paleo, salad, Sides, VeggiesJune 20, 2013No comments

Helloooooo Cucumber Tomato Salad

Do you remember back when you were a teenager and had nothing better to do than drive around and waste time? You probably spent all your money on going out to eat because, honestly, what else was there to do? When I was 16 and 17 ALL I did was hang out at my friends’ houses, wait until lunch or dinner time and then drive over to Noodles & Company. Like clockwork.

In all honesty, I probably went to Noodles (as we called it), on average 5 times a week. No joke. I ALWAYS got the same thing too, Pesto Cavatappi, flat bread covered in butter, and depending on the day one of their ginormous cookies. After about a year of that order I switched to the much “healthier” Pasta Fresca (just looked it up, same amount of calories… haha) and replaced the flatbread with the Cucumber Tomato side-salad.

It did make me a little bit sad after all those countless meals at Noodles that I would no longer be eating there, mainly because I would miss the little salad! But, I no longer have a reason to fret because I REMADE IT. Yeah, buddy. This salad is super quick to throw together and tastes super fresh with some yummy Asian flavors. You totes gotta try it The best parts were the huge, lovely tomato and crisp cucumber I got in my CSA this week. So perfect.

Have you ever seen a more gorgeous tomato? Didn’t think so

On a totally unrelated note, I made The Dr. a semi-paleofied version of his fave cookies on the planet, oatmeal chocolate chip, for his graduation tomorrow. I can not believe it is already tomorrow! AHHH! They are grain free, with grassfed butter, almond butter, and dark chocolate chips BUT they still are chock full of oats and both white and brown sugars… which means I won’t be eating them (well, maybe just one ) but at least they are better FOR him and whoever he decides to share with.

The leaves me with one quick question, would anybody like me to include semi-paleo recipes every once in awhile for those significant others or children who aren’t *quite* paleo? Lemme know whatcha think.

Sweet Potatoes and Smiles,

The Freckled Foodie

Yum

Cucumber Tomato Salad

PREP TIME: 5 minCOOK TIME: minTOTAL TIME: 5 minYIELD: 2-3DIFFICULTY: easyRECIPE TYPE: Side dish, veggies, salad
Ingredients:
1/2 large Tomato
1/2 large Cucumber
1/4 Red onion
2 tbsp Olive oil
1 tbsp Toasted sesame oil
2 tbsp Apple cider vinegar
1 tsp Honey (optional, I left it out)
1/4 tsp Ground ginger
3 dashes Chili powder (more or less, depending on spice taste)
pinch Salt
1/2 tsp Sesame seeds
Freshly grated ginger if you have it
Directions:
In a small bowl combine oils, vinegar, honey, and spices; whisk to combine
Chop the tomato into wedges, slice the cucumber and remove the seeded portion, and slice the red onion thinly
Add veggies to a large bowl and pour dressing over
Let sit for at least 5 minutes to marinate
Serve with grated ginger over the top!
Published on June 20, 2013by thefreckledfoodie

Tagged: asian, cucumber, dairy free, gluten free, grain free, onion, paleo, primal, salad, side dish, tomato, veggies