Category: Kids

Creating a Healthier Next Generation and Supporting a Healthier School Day

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Blog
Creating a Healthier Next Generation and Supporting a Healthier School Day

Thanks to the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010, students across America are being served meals with more fruits, vegetables, whole-grains, lean protein and low-fat dairy. Parents can send their kids to school knowing that the healthy habits they teach at home are being reinforced at school, with breakfast and lunch menus that provide more of the foods we should eat, and less of the foods that we should avoid.

Parents, teachers, school nutrition professionals, communities, and policy makers are working hard to make sure that school environments support a healthier next generation.

Creating a Healthier Next Generation: Thanks to the Healthy Hunger-Free Kids Act, major improvements are being made across the country to promote better nutrition, reduce obesity, and create a healthier next generation. (Click to enlarge).

And these efforts are working. Kids are consuming more healthy food, and school breakfast participation is increasing leading to better test scores and increased attendance. As we move forward with the implementation of the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act, it’s clear that the school day is becoming healthier.

The School Day Just Got Healthier: Thanks to the Healthy Hunger-Free Kids Act, major improvements are being made across the country to promote better nutrition, reduce obesity, and create a healthier next generation. (Click to enlarge).

For more information on supporting healthy choices at school, please visit: http://www.usda.gov/healthierschoolday.

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COLUMBIA MISSOURIAN FROM READERS: Working with children who have disabilities offers rewards

COLUMBIA MISSOURIAN
FROM READERS: Working with children who have disabilities offers rewards

By SHONTE REED/MISSOURIAN READER
February 25, 2014 | 6:00 a.m. CST
Shonte Reed is a senior at MU, where she studies biological sciences.

There are various community service opportunities around the Columbia community, but one of the most rewarding experiences that people can have is working with children who have disabilities.

Services for Independent Living is a local community organization whose mission is to maximize independence for people with disabilities. I started volunteering with them in September.

I specifically volunteered with Kids in the Kitchen, a program that helps teach middle to high school age students the fundamentals of cooking, nutrition and safety when it comes to being in the kitchen. We would make sure that they could be independent in the kitchen while assisting where necessary.

Seeing kids overcoming adversity and slowly learning how to become independent made me realize how much is taken for granted. It is easy for me to go into my kitchen, measure out what my recipe called for and start cooking a meal. For the children I worked with, it has never been that simple and probably never will. What I took for granted is what the children were working so hard to overcome. This changed my perspective on how I view my life. I realized that I, a person without disabilities, take for granted walking, feeding myself and the chance to have a higher education.

Services for Independent Living isn’t the only organization in Columbia that people can volunteer with. Special Olympics is also another great organization that helps people with disabilities. Activities include dances, sports, and the Polar Plunge.

With so many volunteer opportunities in Columbia, I strongly encourage working with children with disabilities.

This story is part of a section of the Missourian called From the Readers, which is dedicated to your voices and your stories. We hope you’ll consider sharing. Here’s how. Supervising editor is Joy Mayer.

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