Ideas

The Benefits of Community Garden in Prison

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Recently I wrote a post on a Community Garden I visited in my neighborhood. See the Post. I did some more research and I found the benefits of Community Gardens are doing in other arenas.  There are prisons that are using gardening to make the prisoners productive.  There is nothing like getting your hands into the dirt, back to Mother Earth.  It is amazing to plant, nurture and watch things come to life before our eyes As we participate in the process of life.

Principles that can be learned through planting and harvesting.

– The evidence of cause and effect

– The growth process is in its own time. We cannot rush growth (in plants or in people)

– We learn that we can sustain ourselves with fresh food and we do not have to be dependent on the large producers who poison our food with chemicals.

– We learn a trade and at harvest we can give or sell or even trade what we cannot eat.

There are so many things to learn.

Please read these stories and see how you can help in your neck of the woods to use gardening to help yourself and someone else.

 

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Every day, four inmates of Texas’s Smith County Jail are transported 18 kilometers from the jail, where they spend the day hard at work. Unlike standard prison labor programs however, the fruits of these prisoners’ labors are actually fruits—and vegetables. Smith County Jail is one of several prisons in the county that are giving inmates the opportunity to give back to the community, and provide fresh produce for themselves.

Since 2010, inmates who have demonstrated good behavior are given the opportunity to work in the Smith County Jail’s garden, where they grow tomatoes, corn, squash, peas, and other produce. The produce is then sent back to the prison, or shipped to nearby communities where local organizations such as the East Texas Food Bankprovide meals to needy families.

To read the rest of the story…

Texas – Prison Gardens

Ohio – Green Thumb Prisoners

 Africa – World Vegetable Center

ingredients

Salt

<a href="http://www.cdc.gov/salt/infographic.htm?s_cid=info-salt-01&utm_campaign=Sodium Infographic&utm_medium=infographic&utm_source=external&utm_content=info-salt-01" title="Tracking down the salt in food with Professor Saul T. Too much sodium increases your risk for high blood pressure, and high blood pressure is the leading cause of heart attack and stroke. By taking the right steps to reduce your sodium intake, your blood pressure can begin decreasing within weeks. About 90% of Americans eat more sodium than is recommended for a healthy diet. Six in 10 adults should aim for 1,500 milligrams a day; others for 2,300 milligrams. Sodium adds up, and sodium levels in the same food can vary widely. Fat free chips can have 180 milligrams per ounce; white bread, up to 230 milligrams per slice; ready-to-eat cereal, 250 milligrams per cup; chicken breast with added solution, up to 330 milligrams per 4 ounces. Foods that you eat several times a day can add up to a lot of sodium, even if each serving is not high in sodium. Read Nutrition labels to find the lowest sodium options. A bowl of regular chicken noodle soup can have 840 milligrams of sodium, but lower sodium chicken noodle soup can have 360 milligrams of sodium. Most of the sodium we eat comes from foods prepared in restaurants and processed foods (not from the salt shaker). Tips you can use to reduce sodium: Choose fresh, frozen (no sauce), or no salt added canned vegetables; Know terms that commonly indicate higher sodium content, like pickled, cured, brined, and broth; Follow the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) eating plan at http://go.usa.gov/p3C. For more tips on reducing sodium in your diet, visit http://go.usa.gov/YJxF. This infographic is brought to you by Million Hearts. millionhearts.hhs.gov"><img src="http://www.cdc.gov/salt/images/info_salt_01.jpg" style="width:1543px; height:1324px; border:0px;" alt="Tracking down the salt in food with Professor Saul T. Too much sodium increases your risk for high blood pressure, and high blood pressure is the leading cause of heart attack and stroke. By taking the right steps to reduce your sodium intake, your blood pressure can begin decreasing within weeks. About 90% of Americans eat more sodium than is recommended for a healthy diet. Six in 10 adults should aim for 1,500 milligrams a day; others for 2,300 milligrams. Sodium adds up, and sodium levels in the same food can vary widely. Fat free chips can have 180 milligrams per ounce; white bread, up to 230 milligrams per slice; ready-to-eat cereal, 250 milligrams per cup; chicken breast with added solution, up to 330 milligrams per 4 ounces. Foods that you eat several times a day can add up to a lot of sodium, even if each serving is not high in sodium. Read Nutrition labels to find the lowest sodium options. A bowl of regular chicken noodle soup can have 840 milligrams of sodium, but lower sodium chicken noodle soup can have 360 milligrams of sodium. Most of the sodium we eat comes from foods prepared in restaurants and processed foods (not from the salt shaker). Tips you can use to reduce sodium: Choose fresh, frozen (no sauce), or no salt added canned vegetables; Know terms that commonly indicate higher sodium content, like pickled, cured, brined, and broth; Follow the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH) eating plan at http://go.usa.gov/p3C. For more tips on reducing sodium in your diet, visit http://go.usa.gov/YJxF. This infographic is brought to you by Million Hearts. millionhearts.hhs.gov" /></a>

Ideas

How To Create a Sexy Egg Dish

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We can egg so many ways until it can become boring. I tried this yesterday and

my daughter told me I need to take pictures and share it so here it. This egg dish is

versatile, because it displays the veggies I decided to use but you can trade

the veggies for others and have a new dish every time!

, you can also omit the crust, and still have a great meal.

It’s a Low Carb Breakfast too. Paleo dieters will love this.

I didn’t use meat but meat can be added to your liking.

Glenda The Good Foodie’s Baked Egg Breakfast Square

Crust:

2 cups almond meal

2 tsp Aluminum-free baking powder

2 Tbl Coconut Oil

2 eggs

1/2 cup water

Mix all dry ingredients in a bowl. Mix all wet ingredients in a bowl. Pour the mixed wet ingredients into the dry ingredients.

Stir until you get a dough like texture.

Pour coconut oil in the baking pan. Place all of the dough on the pan and spread it to each corner with a spatula.

Bake for about 15 minutes or until done. Stick in fork tines to see if the tines are dry. If dry the dough is ready.

Egg Filling: Pre-heat oven to 350 degrees

Break 10 -12 eggs

(bell peppers (all colors), sweet onion, green onion, spinach, asparagus, get creative)

6 mushrooms

2 Tbl Bragg’s Liquid Aminos (find it here: http://astore.amazon.com/healthyliving-20)

Beat the eggs with a whisk until they are scrambled.

Add all the veggies into the egg.

Whisk the eggs until the veggies are well distributed throughout.

Pour the egg filling over the cooked dough.

Bake for 35 minutes

Make sure all of the egg is done,

Cut into squares. Serve with syrup or jam or just eat it as is.

You may want to make this dish ahead so you can take a square to work each work day.

Or you may make a double batch to make sure the kids eat a delicious and nutritious breakfast.

Optional: Add grated cheese or top with cheese, or serve with sour cream and salsa.

The possibilities are endless.

What’s sexy about this egg dish? Sexy like beauty is in the eye of the beholder.

Enjoy!

Glenda the Good Foodie

Ideas

Visit a Community Garden Near You

https://www.dropbox.com/sc/vfw8v9157eje8gk/Bu7UYWRt30 Click here for photos.

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I recently visited a friend of mine, Lenora Lee in California. She and her husband have

developed a garden all around their home. The front yard is a garden and the back yard

is a garden and quiet places.

She really inspired me to look into the community gardens near me.  I did a little digging

and found a community garden near my home.  UTA (University of Texas at Arlington) and the

City of Arlington partner together and off 16 ft x 4 ft plots to residents.  Here are some photos.

Cynthia Ellis from the City called me and shared some vital information with me.  The garden is

cared for by those who farm the plots. 1/2 of the poundage is donated to the Arlington Shelter.

The cost is $35 per calendar year. I went out to get a closer look and I found the garden plots.

I found plots with collard greens, kale, melons, flowers, bell peppers, okra, chard, tomatoes,

and more!

I hope everyone who reads this post will check out their local community garden.  I am on the

waiting list for a plot. I would love to get assigned to a plot to grow food from the seed to the

harvest.  I received a list in my e-mail that gives me the information on when to plant, which

vegetables.

I have attached 2 pdf documents to this post:

Vegetable Planting Dates Texas AgriLife Recommended Planting Dates

Planting Guide

AgriLife Extension – Vegetable Planting Guide (1) AgriLife Extension – Vegetable Planting Guide

 

Link to Video about UTA Community Garden